Sunday, June 29, 2014

World Cup 2014: Brazil fan dies of heart attack as Neymar penalty wins tense shootout vs Chile

By ADAM WITHNALL

Sunday 29 June 2014

A Brazil fan has died after having a heart attack while watching his team’s penalty shootout victory over Chile in the World Cup.

LIVE: Follow the latest news from Netherlands vs Mexico and Costa Rica vs Greece

The 69-year-old man was in a bar not far from the match itself at the Mineirao Stadium in Belo Horizonte when he fell ill and was taken to hospital.

According to a spokesperson for the state health department, the man was taken to hospital but died two hours later. Officials said he had suffered from high blood pressure and diabetes, the Estado de Minas newspaper reported.

Health officials said that in total they had to treat 98 people during the match, including a 50-year-old woman who also had a heart problem while watching the shootout and a man whose nose was broken in a fight.

Brazil went on to win the game 3-2 on penalties, with the score 1-1 after extra time, and progress to face Colombia in the quarter-finals.

Yet despite the high standard of football on show and the furore around Luis Suarez’s on-field antics, the tournament has seemingly been just as eventful away from the pitch.

In Bogota, Colombia, last night a woman was reportedly killed by a stray bullet fired in celebration for the country’s win against Uruguay.

The mayor of Bogota was forced to issue a statement calling on people to be more careful when celebrating, after a number spilled out into the streets and fired guns into the air.

And it has also emerged that an England fan had a part of his ear “bitten off” during his team’s own match against Uruguay in the group stages.

The fan has made a formal complaint but the attacker, who is thought to be another England fan, has not been identified.

Friday, June 27, 2014

4,000-Year-Old Burial with Chariots Discovered in South Caucasus

LiveScience.com

By Owen Jarus, Live Science ContributorThu, Jun 26 12:00 PM GMT+00:00

An ancient burial containing chariots, gold artifacts and possible human sacrifices has been discovered by archaeologists in the country of Georgia, in the south Caucasus.

The burial site, which would've been intended for a chief, dates back over 4,000 years to a time archaeologists call the Early Bronze Age, said Zurab Makharadze, head of the Centre of Archaeology at the Georgian National Museum.

Archaeologists discoveredthe timber burial chamber within a 39-foot-high (12 meters) mound called a kurgan. When the archaeologists reached the chamber they found an assortment of treasures, including two chariots, each with four wooden wheels. [See Images of the Burial Chamber & Chariots]

The team discovered ornamented clay and wooden vessels, flint and obsidian arrowheads, leather and textile artifacts, a unique wooden armchair, carnelian and amber beads and 23 golden artifacts, including rare and artistic crafted jewelry, wrote Makharadze in the summary of a presentation he gave recently at the International Congress on the Archaeology of the Ancient Near East, held at the University of Basel in Switzerland.

"In the burial chamber were placed two four-wheeled chariots, both in good condition, [the] design of which represents fine ornamental details of various styles," Makharadze wrote. Thechamber also contained wild fruits, he added.

While the human remains had been disturbed by a robbery, which probably occurred in ancient times, and were in a disordered position, the archaeologists found that seven people were buried in the chamber. "One of them was a chief and others should be the members of his family, sacrificed slaves or servants," Makharadze told Live Science in an email.

A time before the horse

The burial dates back to a time before domesticated horses appeared in the area, Makharadze said. While no animals were found buried with the chariots, he said, oxen would have pulled them.

Other rich kurgan burials dating to the second half of the third millennium B.C. have also been found in the south Caucasus,said Makharadze in another paper he presented in February at the College de France in Paris. The appearance of these rich burials appears to be connected to interactions that occurred between nomadic people from the Eurasian steppes and farming communities within and near the south Caucasus, Makharadze said.

These interactions appear to have led to some individuals, like this chief, getting elaborate burials. The newly discovered armchair symbolizes the power that individuals like the chief had. "The purpose of the wooden armchair was the indication to power, and it was put in the kurgan as a symbol of power," Makharadze said in the email.

The kurgan was found in eastern Georgia near the municipality of Lagodekhi and was excavated in 2012.

Follow us @livescienceFacebookGoogle+. Original article on Live Science.

In Photos: Amazing Ruins of the Ancient WorldImage Gallery: Bronze Age Donkey BurialIn Photos: 'Alien' Skulls Reveal Odd, Ancient Tradition

Copyright 2014 LiveScience, a TechMediaNetwork company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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4,000-Year-Old Burial with Chariots Discovered in South Caucasus

LiveScience.com

By Owen Jarus, Live Science ContributorThu, Jun 26 12:00 PM GMT+00:00

An ancient burial containing chariots, gold artifacts and possible human sacrifices has been discovered by archaeologists in the country of Georgia, in the south Caucasus.

The burial site, which would've been intended for a chief, dates back over 4,000 years to a time archaeologists call the Early Bronze Age, said Zurab Makharadze, head of the Centre of Archaeology at the Georgian National Museum.

Archaeologists discoveredthe timber burial chamber within a 39-foot-high (12 meters) mound called a kurgan. When the archaeologists reached the chamber they found an assortment of treasures, including two chariots, each with four wooden wheels. [See Images of the Burial Chamber & Chariots]

The team discovered ornamented clay and wooden vessels, flint and obsidian arrowheads, leather and textile artifacts, a unique wooden armchair, carnelian and amber beads and 23 golden artifacts, including rare and artistic crafted jewelry, wrote Makharadze in the summary of a presentation he gave recently at the International Congress on the Archaeology of the Ancient Near East, held at the University of Basel in Switzerland.

"In the burial chamber were placed two four-wheeled chariots, both in good condition, [the] design of which represents fine ornamental details of various styles," Makharadze wrote. Thechamber also contained wild fruits, he added.

While the human remains had been disturbed by a robbery, which probably occurred in ancient times, and were in a disordered position, the archaeologists found that seven people were buried in the chamber. "One of them was a chief and others should be the members of his family, sacrificed slaves or servants," Makharadze told Live Science in an email.

A time before the horse

The burial dates back to a time before domesticated horses appeared in the area, Makharadze said. While no animals were found buried with the chariots, he said, oxen would have pulled them.

Other rich kurgan burials dating to the second half of the third millennium B.C. have also been found in the south Caucasus,said Makharadze in another paper he presented in February at the College de France in Paris. The appearance of these rich burials appears to be connected to interactions that occurred between nomadic people from the Eurasian steppes and farming communities within and near the south Caucasus, Makharadze said.

These interactions appear to have led to some individuals, like this chief, getting elaborate burials. The newly discovered armchair symbolizes the power that individuals like the chief had. "The purpose of the wooden armchair was the indication to power, and it was put in the kurgan as a symbol of power," Makharadze said in the email.

The kurgan was found in eastern Georgia near the municipality of Lagodekhi and was excavated in 2012.

Follow us @livescienceFacebookGoogle+. Original article on Live Science.

In Photos: Amazing Ruins of the Ancient WorldImage Gallery: Bronze Age Donkey BurialIn Photos: 'Alien' Skulls Reveal Odd, Ancient Tradition

Copyright 2014 LiveScience, a TechMediaNetwork company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Thursday, June 26, 2014

Petition to make Father Ted's 'My Lovely Horse' Ireland's Eurovision song turned down

Irish MPs said they 'didn't have the musical expertise' to decide

By LIZZIE DEARDEN

Thursday 26 June 2014

The Irish parliament has turned down a petition to make “My Lovely Horse” fromFather Ted Ireland’s official entry in the Eurovision Song Contest.

The petition, entitled “legislate to make “My Lovely Horse” Ireland’s entry for Eurovision 2015”, was formally submitted to the government in May.

It claimed to come from an unincorporated association called “The People of Ireland (and interested Britons too)”.

The Oireachtas petitions committee did actually consider the request on Wednesday but said it could force Ireland’s national broadcaster to submit the entry, the Irish Examiner reported.

Pádraig Mac Lochlainn, the chairman, said the committee “didn't have the musical expertise” it needed to consider the issue.

The song was made famous in the "A Song for Europe" episode of Father Ted.

A mock music video featured in the comedy series showed Ted and Dougal frolicking in fields with a horse, hugging it and singing to it.

Memorable lyrics included: “I want to shower you with sugar lumps, and ride you over fences, polish your hooves every single day and bring you to the horse dentist.”

The Independent

2 Derry Street London W8 5TT

© independent.co.uk

Biblical Floods Threaten USA-Germany World Cup Match in Recife, Brazil


USA fans head to the stadium in Recife, Brazil ahead of the U.S. Men's National Team's match vs. Germany on Thursday, July 26, 2014.

IMAGE: RICKMAESE

BY BRIAN RIES AND ANDREW FREEDMAN9 minutes ago

The city that's playing host to Thursday's much-anticipated USA vs. Germany World Cup match is underwater.

Recife is located in the northeastern most portion of Brazil, only about 190 miles south of Natal, which was also struck by flooding rains this month. News reports show that the city has received at least three inches of rain in less than 24 hours, which comes after an already unusually rainy month.

SEE ALSO: USA vs. Germany: The Ultimate Preview for Thursday's World Cup Battle

The culprit is a flow of moisture-rich air off the ocean, and Brazil's meteorological service as well as international centers had flagged that part of Brazil, as well as the southeast, as having a likelihood of above average rainfall this summer.

Fans of both teams who are headed to the noon ET match are struggling to reach the stadium, with some roads nearly impassable due to what looks to be foot-deep water. But as things stand now, FIFA officials say the game is on.

Many people are sharing photos and videos of their epic march to the game on Instagram. You can see some of the footage in the interactive map, embedded below. Keep scrolling to see all the tweets and photos from Recife, Brazil.

IMAGE: @FREDCOXJ ON INSTAGRAM

IMAGE: @BERBZSTAGRAM ON INSTAGRAM

IMAGE: @JOSEPHISRAWI ON INSTAGRAM

IMAGE: @JAYIGIEL ON INSTAGRAM

IMAGE: @ROSEMBERG_LIMA ON INSTAGRAM

IMAGE: @KAARUNITA ON INSTAGRAM

IMAGE: @JULYTHEPHOTOGUY ON INSTAGRAM

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Ancient Tattooed Aryan Mummies of Asia

Saturday, June 21, 2014


The barren desert of China’s southern Tarim Basin has been the source of some of the ancient world’s most mysterious tattooed mummies.

 

Central Asian Caucasoids, tall people with red or blond hair and light eyes, had long been the subject of ancient Chinese legend. Then, in the early 20th century, archeologists digging in the Tarim Basin in western China, unearthed mummies resembling these legendary "gods". At first, no one leapt to any conclusions. The prehistoric graveyard must have marked the final resting place for an unfortunate band of migrants.

 

 

But more recently, Chinese archeologists working in the Taklamakan Desert, made further discoveries that forced them to reconsider - hundreds more Caucasian mummies, many of them tattooed with geometric designs.

 

 

They were clothed in garments resembling Celtic plaid, complete with tam-o'-shanters and Robin Hood caps. Perhaps the ancient Chinese legends of how their civilizations were originally started were accurate.

 


Radiocarbon dating established the mummies as living over 4,000 years ago during the height of the Bronze Age, in the 21st century BC. Italian geneticist, Paolo Francalacci, tested the DNA of a few of the mummies and found two of them to be related to modern-day Swedes, Finns, Tuscans, Corsicans, and Sardinians.

 

Struck by the similarities between Ötzi the Iceman and these Caucasoid mummies, Sinologist, Victor Mair, remarked, "These guys out in the Tarim (Basin) are just like him - one's in ice and the others are in sand."

 

These were Indo-European people, ancient Aryans, cousins of the Celts and Scythians, a branch of the family that controlled the Silk Road to Europe from 2500 BC to 400 BC. They influenced cultures as far as Japan, spreading their Caucasoid tattoo culture to the ancestors of Japan's indigenous Ainu.

 

If enterprising Caucasians might have once inhabited Xinjiang province, it was a theory that the Chinese government wanted 'classified'. The version of history they guarded was of a Chinese civilization blossoming in isolation, without any Western influence. Consider, too, that the mummies were exotically tattooed - tattooing had been a crime in China for over two centuries. The less said, the better.

 

 

But not far from the Chinese discoveries, in Russia, on the western edge of the Siberian Plain, dramatic evidence of an ancient tattoo culture was unearthed. And this time, highly publicized. In 450 BC, the Greek writer Herodotus wrote about Scythian nomads to the north, tribes of horsemen who ruled the Eurasian Steppe by horseback, their tattoos acting as 'a mark of nobility, and not to have them was testimony of low birth.' Skeptics assumed Herodotus was dreaming, and held to that opinion for over 2000 years.

 

 

But in 1948, not far from the border with China, a Russian archeologist named Rudenko discovered an astonishingly well-preserved corpse in a frozen Pazyryk burial mound - and ice-bound Scythian chieftain covered with tattoos of mythical animals. He would have been alive as Herodotus was writing about him.

 


They were formidable Iron Age horsemen and warriors. The artifacts found with the mummies suggest they had an appreciation for art - saddles, rugs, clothing, fine gold jewelry, musical instruments, amulets and tools and fabrics from Persia and China.

 

 

But the most artistic of all the wonders were the tattoos, an interlocking array of fantastic beasts on the mummy's arms, shoulder, torso, and one leg. When the evidence was made public, much interest focused on a pair of stylized deer and a mountain ram on the chief's right arm. Stylistically, they recalled the art of Persia, Assyria, India, and particularly China. Boldly graphic, this 'animal style' art influenced cultures wherever the Scythians roamed. Over the years, the Pazyryk burial mounds would produce more frozen mummies, but none more exciting than the 'Ice Maiden'.

 

 

In 1993, the Russian Academy of Sciences went hunting with the latest arsenal of archeological technology and were rewarded with the discovery of another frozen corpse, this one a young woman of obviously high birth, a 'warrior-priestess' buried with six horses. (Some of the burial mounds were up to 100 metres in diameter.)

 

Her white silk dress, elaborate headdress and exotic jewelry were an exciting find, but upon discovering flesh they began peeling back the fabric over her shoulder to reveal dark blue tattoos - once again those familiar mythical creatures. One striking image portrayed a deer's horns morphing into flowers, the muzzle becoming the beak of a bird.

 

The Ice Maiden had more tattoos on her wrist, and one on her thumb. One of her tattoos so closely resembled the chieftain's that it was either drawn from the same stencil, or perhaps by the same artist.

 

This recurring 'deer' motif has puzzled the experts, not least because its convoluted posture with hind legs turned upward suggests an altered state. Signifying what? That those hooves no longer touched this earth, possibly celebrating transcendence or spirituality. 

 

The largest burial mound being 100 meters across and containing not only the royal deceased but many of his horses arranged in spoke-like fashion around the central tomb. Alignments of the galleries with stone mounds in the surrounding area strongly implies that this burial structure has astrological and probably ritual relationships.
 

  

These ancient Aryan horsemen had many rituals, and rites of passage to adulthood were one of them. An examination of the tattooed mummies' subcutaneous fat revealed it to be free of ink, while the deeper layer of muscle was discolored. These tattoos were applied when the person was young, before he put on that layer of fat, later in life.

 

Ancient Legendary Origins of the Samurai

Atlantean Gardens at 9:15 AM

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Struggle With Praise

Bottled inside
Creeper catches
Shapes broken
Fallen waste
The vision
Idea of elegance
Founder of
Shit
Gaze upon self
Mirror of
Torment
See the nothing
It's not there
Is it?
Well the
Trap pulling
Water
Over our
Heads
Never growing
Shame
Shame is
Born
The needle missed
The target
Foul forgetful
Miss
The penetration
Possible reflects
Again
Inside tomorrow
The sign remains
Same
Broken
Broken
Broken
Boy lost
When
Found
Shaking away
Fear
Remembering
The Dawn of
Someone's
Faded
Experience
Paths are there
Take them
Or lost interest
Bones fragile
As Father walks
The steps
Faith
Loser sect
Control your
Puppets
Torn from the oneness
Of Same
Strangers transform
The dust blown
In breeze
Forgotten
Wandering
Cosmos
Shall I
Be this
Because
Fortune smiles
And others have
None to savor
Why must I
Reach strong
Top of
The
Food chain
Struggles happen
No matter
The skin
That which is
Will always be
Same
Forget
It

Willie Nelson Has Important Political Message for Stoners

Rolling Stone

Stephen L. Betts Tue, Jun 24 3:45 PM GMT+00:00

Willie Nelson's Teapot Party movement, which now has more than 115,000 Facebook followers, was founded after his 2010 arrest for marijuana possession in Texas. His practical (and slyly humorous) advice to fellow pot advocates is to support like-minded candidates.

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100 Greatest Singers: Willie Nelson

"Get out and go vote," he says in an interview with CelebStoner News. "If it's the day to go vote, make sure you go vote before you burn one down. Don't get high and forget to vote."

The country legend and tireless marijuana advocate admits even he was surprised when pot was legalized in Colorado and Washington state, noting, "I didn't think it would happen in my lifetime, but here it is. The future looks good."

The 81-year-old performer has even been contacted by the governor's office in Colorado to appear in a public service announcement about marijuana, but has yet to decide whether he'll do it or not. One thing he has decided on is his backing of Texas gubernatorial candidate Wendy Davis, due to her stance in support of medical marijuana. Nelson also has his eye on other changes in the laws regarding pot use and attributes many of those changes to financial concerns.

"There's a lot of money in selling marijuana," he reasons. "If you can do it legally, that's good. Why should all the criminals make the money? This is what people are thinking. If it's happening, if it's going to be legal, let's tax it and regulate it, like we do with everything else, and make some money off this. I think that's one reason why people are taking this a little more seriously."

The singer-songwriter, whose Band of Brothers album was released earlier this month, reveals he's not a big fan of edible marijuana but does advocate vaporizers. He also notes that his daughter Paula, who was busted for pot possession (on 4/20) this year, has since had her case thrown out and taken off the record.

Monday, June 23, 2014

Saturday, June 21, 2014

Seek for Long the Need

The distant
Horizon
The pain
Real as a
Summer breeze
Long this
Journey
To find
The one
Within
The known
Understood
Wind kicks
Up razors
Torn to
Face
Truth
Harsh
It is to
Learn
What
Was
Hidden
Since days
Past
Block
Out
The Sun
Coolness
In shade
The answer
Given
Again
At
Peace

#poetry #freeverse #Search #Innerself

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Common Core upsets home-schooling parents

Associated Press

KIMBERLY HEFLING Mon, Jun 16 7:27 AM GMT+00:00

WASHINGTON (AP) — Home-schooling mom Jenni White gave some of the loudest cheers when Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin signed legislation to repeal the Common Core education standards.

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White, president of Restore Oklahoma Public Education, helped organize rallies, robo calls and letters to legislators encouraging the repeal. "You name it. We had to do it," White said. "We just had to do it out of a shoestring budget out of our own accounts."

In Oklahoma and elsewhere, home-schooling parents, often with their kids, are a frequent presence at legislative hearings and other political functions representing anti-Common Core forces. Sometimes, as in White's case, they are even leading the opposition.

Home-schooling parents can teach their kids what they choose, but many of these parents still have a big beef with the standards.

Facebook groups such as "Home Schooling Without Common Core," have popped up. A Home School Legal Defense Association produced video on the standards has been viewed online hundreds of thousands of times.

"All parents should be concerned about this. This is our children. To me, it's not political," said Megan King of Lawrence, Kansas. She pulled two of her three sons out of their public elementary school, in part, because of the math standards, and she co-founded Kansans Against Common Core.

The standards, adopted in more than 40 states and the District of Columbia, spell out what math and English skills public school students should master at each grade. They were pushed by governors concerned that too few graduates were ready for life after high school.

Use of the standards has become a hot button issue in many states, and governors in Indiana and South Carolina recently signed legislation repealing them. The issue has pitted Chamber of Commerce-aligned Republicans with grassroots conservatives, including many home-schooling parents.

The Common Core effort was led by the states, but the Obama administration has offered incentives to those that adopted "college and career" ready standards. That has led to charges of federal intrusion.

The concern that the more education policy is centralized, "the less control they have as citizens" motivates many of these home-schooling parents, said Emmett McGroarty, director of education at the conservative American Principles Project.

Some of these parents, like King, believe the standards are poorly designed. King said she believes the math standards are developmentally inappropriate for younger kids, not rigorous enough for older students and too heavy on pushing informational text over literature.

Other home-schoolers fear that as textbook publishers incorporate the standards, it will lead to a smaller number of non-Common Core based-textbooks, said White, from Luther, Oklahoma. She says she teaches her children using "classically" aligned texts.

McGroarty said there is a concern that the ACT and the College Board, which owns the SAT, are moving toward aligning with the standards. That, he said, would leave home-schooling parents no choice other than to follow the standards if they want their kids to do well on the college entrance exams.

An ACT official said the company supports the Common Core standards, but the exam hasn't changed because of them. The College Board, which is revamping the SAT, has said the new version of the exam isn't aligned to a single set of standards.

Mike Donnelly of the Home School Legal Defense Association, based in Purcellville, Virginia, said there isn't anything "inherently objectionable" in the Common Core standards, but there is concern that if the standards become more mainstream, there will be more pressure for home-schooled students to conform to them.

A majority of states do not require home-schooled students to take a standardized assessment. In those that do, parents are offered a range of standardized assessments they can use, so it's possible that home-schooling students in some states could take a Common Core-based assessment or that in the future, there will be fewer options for these students, Donnelly said.

"That's the concern we have, that our students are going to be marginalized by this Common Core system and we'll have difficulty and we'll be pressured and pulled into kind of participating, and we don't want to do that," Donnelly said.

Today, home schooling is much more acceptable than it was in the past, and an estimated 3 percent of students are educated at home today, according to Education Department statistics. Years of political battles taught these families to be "very politically savvy," McGroarty said.

Michael Petrilli, executive vice president of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, an education think tank, has testified before state legislative bodies in favor of the standards. He said the issue goes beyond the standards themselves. "This is much more of a fundamental, ideological concern for them," he said.

Carmel Martin, a former Obama administration Education Department official who is the executive vice president for policy at the liberal Center for American Progress, said she finds home-schooling parents' opposition to the standards a bit "perplexing."

"Those families make a personal choice, which is a legitimate choice that they are going to handle their child's education at home, so the Common Core doesn't really affect them," Martin said. "They have the option just like a private school to decide what curriculum is going to be used for their children."

Shane Vander Hart, a home-schooling dad in Des Moines, Iowa, runs two conservative-bent web sites and has done contract work for the American Principles Project. He said that even though his family is "going to do what we're going to do anyway," he's concerned about what the standards will do to public education.

"A one size fits all approach does not work and that's one of the primary reasons many of us homeschool," Vander Hart said.

_____

Follow Kimberly Hefling on Twitter: http://twitter.com/khefling

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A 100-year-old drug corrects autistic social behaviors in lab tests

By Arielle Duhaime-Ross 4 Hours Ago

(Rama / Wikimedia Commons)

Old drugs can sometimes yield surprising results. A well-known diabetes pill called Metformin, for instance, is now being used to treat certain cancers. And Thalidomide, a drug used as a sedative in the ’50s, is now used to treat leprosy and bone marrow cancer. But a new study published today inTranslational Psychiatry might beat these examples, as it reveals that suramin, a drug that was developed in 1916 to treat African sleeping sickness, can restore normal social behaviors in adult mouse models of autism. These results won't lead to new autism therapies right away — suramin has not been tested on humans with autism, and it's actually toxic if dispensed for longer than a few months — they do hint at the new directions that researchers might explore.

THE MICE BECAME MORE SOCIAL AFTER A SINGLE DOSE

In the study, researchers administered a dose of suramin to 25 male mice, whereas another 25 males received a saline injection instead. All mice were "maternal immune activation mouse models," meaning animals that exhibit autism-like behaviors following a virus infection in their mothers during pregnancy. This single dose, the researchers report, corrected the social behaviors seen in autism spectrum disorder. The mice, for instance, spent more time interacting with both mice and objects they had never interacted with before, compared to those injected with a saline solution. The benefits lasted for five weeks after the drug was washed out of their system.

The scientists think suramin acts by binding to, and inhibiting, 19 different receptors — called "purinergic" receptors — that are expressed on every cell type in the body. This binding action prevents ATP, our body's energetic currency unit, from binding to these specific receptors, which then helps turn off a cellular response known as the "cell danger response."

THE CELL DANGER RESPONSE CAN CHANGE THE TRAJECTORY OF NEURODEVELOPMENT

"The cell danger response is an evolutionarily conserved set of about 30 metabolic changes that help protect cells from threat," explained Robert Naviaux, a geneticist at the University of California San Diego and lead author of the study, in an email to The Verge. These metabolic changes can be beneficial, because they allow the re-allocation of energetic resources in times of stress, like when the body encounters viruses, pollutants, or even certain drugs. But "when significant exposures happen during pregnancy or in early childhood," Naviaux said, "the trajectory of neurodevelopment can be changed." Moreover, "cells retain a metabolic memory of these significant exposures according to the severity of the stress and the developmental timing of the exposure."

So, if the change in resource allocation is severe enough, it may also alter normal cellular functions that are required for healthy neurodevelopment. And suramin's binding action seems to reverse this change in function by allowing cells to return to their normal metabolism, Naviaux said — "and their normal jobs."

SURAMIN IS TOXIC IN THE LONG-RUN

Unfortunately, suramin can't be administered for longer than a few months because of long-term toxicity. Naviaux thinks people shouldn't focus on that aspect of the study, however, because scientist may one day find less damaging drugs that have similar effects. These therapies could be given "only once or intermittently," he says, to unblock metabolism and restore more normal social behaviors.

"This really takes a novel approach to understanding what's going on in autism," says Richard Frye, director of autism research at the University of Arkansas who did not participate in the study. "I think the argument that, when a cell senses danger, it changes its metabolism to protect itself makes a lot of sense — and it makes a lot of sense with what we see in autism."

"IT MAKES A LOT OF SENSE WITH WHAT WE SEE IN AUTISM."

But other researchers are less enthusiastic. "[The findings] are valuable, but the main problem is that they rely on a model of immune infection, not a genuine model of autism," said Yehezkel Ben-Ari, an autism researcher at the Mediterranean Institute of Neurobiology who was not involved in the study, in an email to The Verge. "They should have tested one of the classical models of autism," he said — meaning genetic models of autism — to see whether suramin indeed corrects autistic behaviors.

Naviaux has heard such criticisms before, and argues that the model is appropriate given that serious viral infections and fevers during human pregnancy can increase the risk of autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders in children. In addition, he said, the mouse model "actually produces more severe symptoms" than many of the conventional autism animal models. "No animal model is a perfect match for complex human diseases like autism or schizophrenia," Naviaux said, but this is "one of the best."

There are other possible limitations to this work. For example, this mouse model doesn't reproduce all behaviors linked to autism, such as repetitive behaviors. The study also involved a small number of mice, and the researchers only tested suramin on males.

"GENES INTERACT WITH ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS."

It should also be noted that Naviaux's explanation for behavioral symptoms seen in people with autism spectrum disorder doesn't contradict current notions regarding its genetics. "It is very clear that genes interact with environmental factors to cause autism," Naviaux said. But "even in the rare cases of single genes that can increase the risk of autism spectrum disorders, no single-gene disorder produces [autism] in 100 percent of the children who have the gene."

The idea that autism might be the result of abnormal cell communication is still fairly new. But Naviaux thinks exploring the cell danger response theory is important. "According to the theory, abnormal cell metabolism can result from genes, environment, or both," he said. So, the key to treatment may lie in finding the way to restore normal cell metabolism, and more normal development as a result. "Some things that we thought were a permanent feature of the mouse models, are actually treatable with the right metabolic intervention," Naviaux said, which means that "despite the permanent loss of certain brain cell connections in the mouse models of autism ... social and exploratory behaviors can be improved with the right treatment."

Thursday, June 12, 2014

#Checkout this upcoming show at #FLAT in #Brooklyn!!

Hey everyone, if you are in NY, go check out Man Child at FLAT!!

July 2nd Matt Anderson (Man Child) with 5ystemic

FLAT Brooklyn -

308 Hooper St, New York, NY 11211
(718) 599-5151

21+  $3 at the door

Time: 10pm

*Please tell them at the #door that you heard about the #show from a #promoter.*

#Thanks :)

Tuesday, June 3, 2014

Dave Brockie, GWAR lead singer, died of accidental heroin overdose

RICHMOND, Va. — Dave Brockie, lead singer and mastermind of Richmond-based art/shock-rock metal band GWAR died of an accidental heroin overdose, according to the State Medical Examiner’s Office.

The M.E.’s official cause of death: acute heroin toxicity, means: accident.

Brockie, was found unresponsive by his roommate in his North Richmond home on March 23. Responding police investigators found evidence of heroin use, but the cause of death wasn’t finalized until toxicology tests were completed.

Click here for CBS 6 coverage of Dave Brockie

Close friends told CBS-6 that they had been worried about his behavior and suspected his known penchant for marijuana smoking and partying had taken a bad turn.

He was known as the prime heartbeat and creative leader of a large theatrical troupe popular around the world and twice nominated for a Grammy.

Just prior to his death, the band completed a tour of Japan, something Brockie had wanted to do for a long time.

Beyond his music, Brockie was known for his art, sculpture, writing and his quick and wildly irreverent wit, appearing regularly on the Fox network Red-eye news talk show.

His death sent shockwaves around the world

FILED IN: MARK HOLMBERG REPORTS

TOPICS: DAVE BROCKIE

Sunday, June 1, 2014

'BRADY BUNCH' ALICE DEAD AT 88 After Bathroom Fall

1 Hour Ago

 

EXCLUSIVE DETAILS

TV legend Ann B. Davis who played Alice on "The Brady Bunch" has died ... TMZ has learned.

According to the couple she lived with in Texas ... Ann fell in her bathroom early this morning and hit her head causing grave damage.  We're told she never regained consciousness.

Her roommate says Davis had been pretty healthy for an 88-year old woman -- and her death was a total shock.  In fact, she even walked downstairs to say goodnight before going to bed.

Davis played the housekeeper Alice Nelson for the entire original run of "The Brady Bunch" from 1969 to 1974. She also filled the role for countless other TV movies and reunions. She last played Alice for 5 episodes of "The Bradys" in 1990.

We're told Ann was very close to some members of the church she attended in Texas -- and they are currently planning funeral arrangements.


http://m.tmz.com/#Article/2014/06/01/ann-b-davis-dead-alice-from-the-brady-bunch-dies-at-age-88

Virginia Court Official Tells Atheist Couple They Have No Right To Get Married Because They Don’t Believe In God

AUTHOR: STEPHEN D. FOSTER JR. MAY 31, 2014 3:40 PM

 

Photo from Patheos

Marriage is a right that belongs to any consenting adults. But an over-religious court official in Virginia has a message for atheists and any other non-Christian: you have no right to get married if you don’t believe in God.

Bud Roth is a court appointed officiant in Franklin County, Virginia. He performs wedding ceremonies for couples who go to the courthouse to get married. Atheists, however, have no right to get married as far as he’s concerned.

When Morgan Strong and Tamar Courtney contacted the county courthouse to seal their love for each other after six years together, they were directed to Roth. Roth refused to perform the ceremony at the courthouse and only agreed to marry the couple if they tied the knot at his church. A deal was struck and the cost and date were set. Strong and Courtney would go through the legal part of the ceremony at Roth’s church. That’s when the whole situation turned ugly.

Roth asked the couple about their religious beliefs and upon hearing that he would be performing a ceremony for an atheist and an agnostic, turned the couple away. Why? Because they “didn’t know where God was.” That’s right, Roth refused to marry the couple out of sheer religious bigotry. Disappointed, Morgan and Courtney decided to discuss the situation with Roth and they kindly recorded the conversation.

Upon asking why Roth denied them their right to wed, he replied:

“Because she’s agnostic and you’re an atheist. I will not marry you. You don’t believe in God… I just don’t marry anyone who does not believe in God [or] believes that there is a God someplace. So I’m not going to talk the issue over with you and I’m not going to argue about it, okay? I’m just not going to marry you. Correct?”


The couple contacted the county clerk, who was floored by their story. She suggested they contact the judge who appointed Roth in the first place. So they wrote a letter to Judge William Alexander who didn’t see any problem at all with a court officiant refusing to marry a couple simply because they don’t share his religious beliefs. The judge referred the couple to the other court appointed officiant who agreed to perform the civil ceremony this coming Monday.

But this incident raises serious concerns. First, a civil servant is supposed to serve the public. That means anyone. As long as a couple has a marriage license, there shouldn’t be any problem. Second, religious discrimination is wrong no matter the venue, but for it to occur at a courthouse by a court official is totally unacceptable. People go to get married at a courthouse to avoid religious pomp and circumstance and because it’s quicker. They don’t go there to have religion shoved down their throats. That’s why my wife and I married at a courthouse. Not because we didn’t believe in a god, but because we didn’t want religion to dominate our day.

Roth was wrong to refuse to perform the ceremony just because Morgan and Courtney don’t share his beliefs. He was also wrong to require them to get married at his church. He’s a COURT-APPOINTED OFFICIANT, for crying out loud! He’s a courthouse employee. Therefore, anyone who wishes to marry at the courthouse should be married at the courthouse. Even if he’s the one asked to perform the ceremony. He’s paid by taxpayers to do this task. He’s not paid to drag couples to church or to refuse to marry a couple because of his own religious beliefs. Separation of church and state is clearly being violated here by both Judge Alexander and Roth. If Roth were a private citizen, then he could refuse to marry anyone. But in this case, he’s NOT a private citizen. The people of Franklin County, Virginia should be embarrassed and outraged by this and they should demand a change be made. Because once religious discrimination infects our courts, anyone is at risk to have their rights and freedoms trampled on by self-righteous pricks in the name of Christianity.